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How this startup launched its long-time internal tool for hosting better meetings into a new product that makes you feel like you’re in a real office

  • Signalwire, which makes APIs and open source software for online communication is releasing a new video conferencing platform that’s meant to replicate an office environment in a virtual setting. 
  • Cantina runs in a browser and gives users the open to end-to-end encrypt meetings. It also has standing meeting rooms people can pop into to recreate the feeling of being in an office. 
  • The new app comes after Signalwire cofounder Anthony Minessale worked for years on open source software for online communications.
  • He started Signalwire in 2017 alongside Heiney to create a business model around the software and introduce APIs for online voice, video and text communication to sell to customers. 
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Here’s how this digital communications startup built a video conferencing tool that can replicate the feeling of an in-office environment

Anthony Minessale and Sean Heiney have been working together to create better video communication tools for the last decade. After meeting through Minessale’s open-source communication project FreeSWITCH, they cofounded a video API startup, SignalWire, which is now launching a new video conferencing platform that they say works better than competitors like Zoom.

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